Successfully reported this slideshow.
We use your LinkedIn profile and activity data to personalize ads and to show you more relevant ads.
Corrugated 101
A User’s guide to the weird world of corrugated
packaging
Presented By
Kurt Buche – Design Lab Manager
Kurt has 11 years of packaging experience and several
roles within the Advanc...
With Special Guests
Bryan Rybiski – Customer Service
Manager
Bryan has 12 years of experience at Advance Packaging,
and is...
Part 1: What is corrugated paperboard?
• Containerboard is classified as
• Singlewall (liner, fluted medium,
liner)
• Doub...
Strength Tests
• Corrugated is also classified by its
strength
• ECT or Edge Crush Test refers to the stacking
strength. T...
Circular stamps have the following information from Item
222/Rule 41 table and states the box meets those general
requirem...
Item 222 and Rule 41 Table
Part 2: Packaging Styles
• Since this is a 101 webinar, we will just be covering the most
common styles of cartons, trays,...
Slotted Containers
 RSC - Regular Slotted Container: This box has top
and bottom flaps that are the same length (1/2 the
...
Auto-lock and 1-2-3 Bottom Boxes
These two styles are easy to set up by hand and on some specialty case erectors, but they...
Trays
 Telebody/Telecover: These trays are shipped flat and require the user to tape, glue, or staple the
flaps before us...
Trays Continued
Telebody/Telecover In Fold Tray Out Fold TrayRoll End Tray
Folders
Folders are shipped flat, provide an unbroken bottom, and fold or wrap around product. The most
common styles are:...
Part 3: Graphics
Options
Questions?
• Talk to your sales or customer
service representative
• Contact us at 616.949.6610
• Visit us online at
www.a...
Corrugated 101
Corrugated 101
Corrugated 101
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

Corrugated 101

1,327 views

Published on

A User's guide to corrugated packaging from paper to carton styles to printing and graphic options for corrugated buyers, product designers, and packaging supervisors

Published in: Business
  • Be the first to comment

Corrugated 101

  1. 1. Corrugated 101 A User’s guide to the weird world of corrugated packaging
  2. Presented By Kurt Buche – Design Lab Manager Kurt has 11 years of packaging experience and several roles within the Advance Packaging design lab including: designer, customer liaison engineer, testing supervisor, and design lab manager. Kurt is a graduate of Michigan State University with a BS in Packaging, he is also a certified ISTA CPLP test technician Catherine Cole – Sales and Marketing Analyst Catherine has been with Advance Packaging for the past 7 years in a variety of roles throughout the Customer Service and Sales Departments. Catherine holds an MBA from Grand Valley State University
  3. With Special Guests Bryan Rybiski – Customer Service Manager Bryan has 12 years of experience at Advance Packaging, and is a graduate of the School of Packaging at Michigan State University with a Bachelor of Science in Packaging Engineering Kevin Smeenge – Customer Liaison Engineer Kevin has 13 years of experience with Advance Packaging in several roles including factory ticket coordinator, designer, and customer liaison engineer. Kevin is a graduate of Western Michigan University with a BS in industrial design
  4. Part 1: What is corrugated paperboard? • Containerboard is classified as • Singlewall (liner, fluted medium, liner) • Doublewall (liner, medium, liner, medium, liner) • Triplewall (liner, medium, liner, medium, liner, medium, liner) • Each flute size and combination offers varying strength, rigidity, and printing surface. • Larger flutes and additional walls add strength • Smaller flutes make for a better printing surface • Advance Packaging Offers • Singlewall: B, C, and E flutes • Doublewall: BC, EC, and EB Corrugated paperboard, sometimes called containerboard, is created by adhering the fluted medium to liner to create a rigid board that can be scored, cut, folded, and glued to make cartons, trays, partitions, displays, inserts, and a host of other packaging products Standard Corrugated Flute Sizes Flute Designation Flute thickness (in) Flute thickness (mm) A flute 3⁄16 4.8 B flute 1⁄8 3.2 C flute 5⁄32 4 E flute 1⁄16 1.6 F flute 1⁄32 0.8
  5. Strength Tests • Corrugated is also classified by its strength • ECT or Edge Crush Test refers to the stacking strength. That is, how many pounds per square inch can be applied before crushing • Mullen Test refers to the bursting strength or pounds per square inch applied before bursting • Mullen is best suited for protecting heavier contents while Edge Crush is lightweight and better suited for stacking. Edge Crush also boasts a higher recycled content
  6. Circular stamps have the following information from Item 222/Rule 41 table and states the box meets those general requirements • Board Grade (Mullen or ECT) • Size limit, outside dimensions (length + width + depth not to exceed) • Gross weight limit • Construction (single-wall, double-wall, triple-wall, etc.) • Manufacturers name and location Square stamps simply state the board grade in either an ECT value or Mullen grade along with the manufacturers name and location. Does not meet Item 222/Rule 41 requirements Cert Stamps Continued Circle vs. Rectangle: what do they mean?
  7. Item 222 and Rule 41 Table
  8. Part 2: Packaging Styles • Since this is a 101 webinar, we will just be covering the most common styles of cartons, trays, and folders. • Advance Packaging has expert designers, sales agents, and customer service representatives who are able to answer your questions on more complicated packaging or display needs
  9. Slotted Containers  RSC - Regular Slotted Container: This box has top and bottom flaps that are the same length (1/2 the width of the box). The outer two flaps meet in the middle when folded  Benefits of this style: economical to produce and can be opened and sealed quickly by hand or with automated equipment  HSC – Half Slotted Container: This style is the same as the RSC, but has only one set of flaps  Benefits of this style: highly economical to produce, easy to load, and can be used with a tray cover  FOL – Full Overlap Slotted Container: Top and bottom flaps are all the same length (the width of the box) and when closed, the flaps cover the entire top and bottom  Benefits of this style: Adds extra protection and cushioning to ends. It is also best for cartons with narrow widths Slotted containers are the simplest and most common types of boxes. They are generally made from a single blank, and usually do not require any tooling to make
  10. Auto-lock and 1-2-3 Bottom Boxes These two styles are easy to set up by hand and on some specialty case erectors, but they require tooling. Auto bottom boxes are easy to open and do not require any tape to seal the bottom. They require half the labor of RSCs to set up 1-2-3 bottom boxes are also easy to set up, and the bottom snaps into place and holds. The bottom is not fully sealed, however, and not recommended for heavy loads
  11. Trays  Telebody/Telecover: These trays are shipped flat and require the user to tape, glue, or staple the flaps before using  Benefits of this style: It is the most economical to produce and generally requires no tooling  Roll End Trays: These Trays are also shipped flat, but the ends fold over and lock into place  Benefits of this style: It is economical to produce (but does require tooling), and it does not require sealing  In Fold Tray: This is a pre-glued tray that requires less labor to set up than telebodies and covers, but it requires tooling to produce  Benefits of this style: When used as a cover, the sides will not “flare out” like the out fold tray  Out Fold Tray: Another type of pre-glued tray that also requires tooling. It is more economical to produce and folds flatter than the in fold, but requires product to stay fully open Trays can be used to hold product, to serve as covers, or to telescope into a bottom and overlapping top
  12. Trays Continued Telebody/Telecover In Fold Tray Out Fold TrayRoll End Tray
  13. Folders Folders are shipped flat, provide an unbroken bottom, and fold or wrap around product. The most common styles are: • OPF – One Panel Folder: Used for long parts with shallow depths. Flaps for the sides and ends, and extensions of the side flaps meet in the middle FF5PF – Full Flap Five Panel Folder: Used for long, thin parts, and has a 5th panel to act as a closing flap. Provides excellent end protection
  14. Part 3: Graphics Options
  15. Questions? • Talk to your sales or customer service representative • Contact us at 616.949.6610 • Visit us online at www.advancepkg.com
777834.nissan-ask.com.ua

у нас

ry-diplomer.com/diplomy-v-starom-oskole

×